The 100-Lead Challenge

A graphic with the words "100-Lead Challenge."

On Dec. 1, I issued the 600 gyms in our Growth program a challenge:

Get 100 leads into a chat conversation as fast as possible.

I offered a prize (a thousand bucks, plus two Two-Brain Summit tickets), but the real prize was a brand-new way to get clients.

Now, don’t be confused by the term “leads.” A “lead” isn’t a Facebook like or an Instagram follow. A “lead,” in this case, is a conversation started with a real human.

The winner, Tim Caputo, got 100 leads in 18 days using this new strategy.

Two days later, another gym owner hit 100 leads.

One of my testers, Taryn, has generated 50 leads—but has sold $30,000 in coaching in a month.

How are they doing it? In this series, I’ll share the strategy with you.

But you need to know: These aren’t the old Facebook-marketing six-week “challenges” that require a gym owner to sell their soul. It’s not the newest bait-and-switch “free if you make your goal!” trick. It’s really just starting conversations with humans.

Remember humans? They’re more than their Facebook and Instagram profiles.

When you talk with them, they usually show you how to help them.


Facebook Groups and Help First


Let’s start at the top of the funnel: a free local Facebook group.

In “Help First,” I wrote about the value of creating a private space for people on the edge of your tribe. Facebook makes this really easy. Your mission, in this group, is to provide free help for people. (“Help First” … get it?)

Two or three times per week, you will publish helpful content in this group. I mean really helpful stuff, not the “what’s your favorite color?” posts most people use.

Want an example? Join the Gym Owners United Facebook group. We share free stuff daily with almost 5,000 people worldwide. Most of them will never be in our mentorship program. And that’s OK.

Then, every couple of weeks, you’re going to post something that starts a conversation in your group. This is a really big, valuable “give”—maybe something that makes you uncomfortable to provide for free.

For example, maybe it’s a free nutrition plan or walking plan. Not a free trial to your service but some piece of knowledge people will value.

You’re going to ask, “Who wants this?” and then send them the resource via chat. And that big gift is the first message in your conversation.

In the next post in this series, I’ll tell you how to have better conversations with people you want to help.


Other Articles in This Series


“The 100-Lead Challenge: Building an Audience”
“The 100-Lead Challenge: Lead Nurture”

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